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Feb / 15

The footprint of Roman Barcelona

Barcelona’s origins go back to the 1st century BC, between 15-10 BC. That was when Emperor Augustus founded the Iulia Augusta Faventia Paterna Bàrcino colony. The city’s Roman past has left its mark on modern Barcelona. Many Roman remains can be seen while walking around the city, along the Barcelona History Museum’s suggested route.

Travel / monuments

Aquaducte i muralla

Barcelona’s origins go back to the 1st century BC, between 15-10 BC. That was when Emperor Augustus founded the Iulia Augusta Faventia Paterna Bàrcino colony. The city’s Roman past has left its mark on modern Barcelona. Many Roman remains can be seen while walking around the city, along the Barcelona History Museum’s suggested route.

‘Roman Barcelona’ video

 

Ancient Bàrcino was surrounded by a city wall with four entrance gates. These gates were located on the city’s main axes. One was at the present-day Plaça Nova, where one of the lateral pedestrian passages and the two semicircular towers are still conserved. But that is not the only gate that can be seen in the city. There is also one at Pati Llimona, where you can also visit its lateral pedestrian passage.

 

The remains of the city wall that surrounded Bàrcino can be found in various city streets. These include Carrer de la PallaCarrer Sots-tinent Navarro and Baixada de Caçador.

 

There is a Roman temple on Carrer Paradís which dates from the end of the 1st century BC. The temple was located at the Forum, or the city’s public square, where many public buildings were located. Four of its columns have been conserved.

 

Bàrcino had two aqueducts that brought water to the city , one from the Besòs river and the other from Collserola. Both of them reached the gate at the present-day Plaça Nova. There are still four arches from one of the aqueducts to be seen at Plaça 8 de Març.

 

There were tombs and mausoleums outside the Roman city, as can be seen at the necropolis that is still conserved in Plaça Vila de Madrid. Necropolises used to be located around the roads leading to the city’s entrance gates. At Plaça Vila de Madrid, the tombs were on both sides of the roadway.

 

In order to recover all the historic heritage left behind by the Romans, and above all that which is hidden away, the City Council set in motion its Bàrcino Plan, which has various operations currently underway. You can find out all about this plan at this link.